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7 eye exercises


Many people believe that eye exercises can help improve vision or treat eye conditions.

Although there is limited evidence to suggest that eye exercises can actually enhance vision, eye exercises can help with eye strain, certain eye conditions, and overall well-being.

Eye exercises can be particularly helpful for people who experience digital eye strain, which is related to the prolonged use of computers.

Read on to learn about seven eye exercises.

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Looking away from a computer screen every 20 minutes may help people with digital eye strain.

Eye exercises can be helpful for the following conditions:

  • nystagmus, which is an eye movement condition
  • strabismus, which is also an eye movement condition
  • amblyopia
  • myopia
  • visual field defects
  • dyslexia
  • vergence problems
  • ocular motility conditions
  • accommodative dysfunction
  • asthenopia
  • convergence insufficiency
  • visual field deficits following brain injury
  • motion sickness
  • learning difficulties

It is important to note that people with eye conditions such as retinopathy, cataracts, or glaucoma are unlikely to benefit from trying the eye exercises below.

The following are seven eye exercises that people may wish to try for the conditions listed above:

1. The 20-20-20 rule

Digital eye strain can become a problem for people who need to focus on a computer screen all day while working.

The 20-20-20 rule helps ease digital eye strain. The rule is easy: a person needs to look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds every 20 minutes while working on a computer.

Learn more about the 20-20-20 rule here.

2. Focus change

The focus change exercise can also help with digital eye strain. People should perform this exercise while sitting.

  1. Hold one finger a few inches away from one eye.
  2. Focus the gaze on the finger.
  3. Move the finger slowly away from the face.
  4. Focus on an object farther away, and then back on the finger.
  5. Bring the finger back closer to the eye.
  6. Focus on an object farther away.
  7. Repeat three times.

3. Eye movements

This eye movement exercise also helps with digital eye strain.

  1. Close the eyes.
  2. Slowly move the eyes upward, then downward.
  3. Repeat three times.
  4. Slowly move the eyes to the left, then to the right.
  5. Repeat three times.

4. Figure 8

The figure 8 exercise can also help ease digital eye strain.

  1. Focus on an area on the floor around 8 feet away.
  2. Move the eyes in the shape of a figure 8.
  3. Trace the imaginary figure 8 for 30 seconds, then switch direction.

5. Pencil pushups

Pencil pushups can help people with convergence insufficiency. A doctor might recommend this exercise as part of vision therapy.

  1. Hold a pencil at arm’s length, situated between the eyes.
  2. Look at the pencil and try to keep a single image of it while slowly moving it toward the nose.
  3. Move the pencil toward the nose until the pencil is no longer a single image.
  4. Position the pencil at the closest point where it is still a single image.
  5. Repeat 20 times.

6. Brock string

The Brock string exercise helps improve eye coordination.

To complete this exercise, a person will need a long string and some colored beads. They can complete this exercise either sitting or standing.

  1. Secure one end of the string to a motionless object, or another person can hold it.
  2. Hold the other end of the string just below the nose.
  3. Place one bead on the string.
  4. Look straight at the bead with both eyes open.

If the eyes are working correctly, a person should see the bead and two strings in the shape of an X.

If one eye is closed, one of the strings will disappear, which means that the eye is suppressing. If the person sees two beads and two strings, the eyes are not converged at the bead.

7. Barrel cards

Barrel cards is a good exercise for exotropia, which is a type of strabismus.

  1. Draw three red barrels of increasing sizes on one side of a card.
  2. Repeat in green on the other side of the card.
  3. Hold the card against the nose so that the largest barrel is farthest away.
  4. Stare at the far barrel until it becomes one image with both colors and the other two images have doubled.
  5. Maintain the gaze for about 5 seconds.
  6. Repeat the exercise with the middle and smallest images.

There is currently little reliable evidence to suggest that eye exercises really work to improve the eyes and vision.

One study found that eye exercises can help with convergence problems. Another study suggested that eye exercises improved visual field deficits and stereoscopic skills following brain injury.

In one 2013 study, participants who completed eye exercises were more accurate in a rapid serial visual presentation exercise than the control group. These results suggest that eye exercises may enhance cognitive performance in tasks that involve attention and memory.

The pencil pushups exercise appears to be an effective therapy for symptomatic convergence insufficiency.

Aside from these few cases, researchers have not proven that eye exercises are an effective treatment for other types of visual or intellectual conditions.

However, certain foods may benefit eye health. Read about them here.

Vision therapy is like rehabilitation therapy for a person’s eyes.

A doctor can prescribe vision therapy, which they will tailor to each person, to help improve visual skills and processing. Vision therapy may use both sensory- and movement-related activities.

Vision therapy typically involves a range of different tools, including computer programs, special instruments, lenses, and prisms.

Vision therapy can be useful for some of the eye conditions listed in this article.

Certain eye symptoms can indicate a more serious condition. A person should contact a doctor if they experience any of the following symptoms:

  • red eyes
  • loss of vision
  • blurred vision
  • eye pain
  • double vision
  • eyelid swelling
  • sensitivity to light
  • headaches associated with eye symptoms

There is not much scientific evidence to suggest that eye exercises help improve vision in general. However, eye exercises and vision therapy can help with digital eye strain and certain eye conditions.

A person can easily perform eye exercises such as the 20-20-20 rule, figure 8, and pencil pushups at home.

If a person experiences blurred vision, red eyes, or eye pain or has concerns about their vision, they should contact their doctor.



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This entry was posted on January 31, 2020, in News.

Dry mouth at night: Causes and treatments


The following are some potential causes of dry mouth at night.

Natural variation in saliva production

According to an article in the journal Compendium, a person’s salivary glands typically produce less saliva at night. As a result, some people may notice that their mouths feel drier in the evening.

Treatment:

A doctor may prescribe special mouthwashes that can moisten the mouth and reduce sensations of dry mouth before bedtime.

People should also consider keeping a glass of water by their bedside. If a person wakes up with a dry mouth, drinking some water will help moisten the mouth.

Dehydration

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, an estimated 20% of older adults struggle with dry mouth. In older adults, this condition usually occurs as a result of dehydration or as a side effect of certain medications.

Older adults who wear dentures may find that they no longer fit properly as a result of dry mouth. Without adequate saliva, dentures can rub against the gums, causing sore spots.

Treatment:

A person who experiences dry mouth should visit their doctor or dentist who will help determine the cause of the condition.

If dry mouth is due to the medications a person is taking, the doctor or dentist may recommend changing the dosage or switching to a different drug.

In some cases, people may receive medications to improve the function of the salivary glands.

Medication side effects

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services state that more than 400 medicines can reduce the body’s ability to produce saliva. People who take their medications at nighttime may notice their dry mouth symptoms worsening at night.

Some medications that can cause dry mouth include:

Treatment:

A person should see their doctor if they suspect that their medication is causing dry mouth. However, people should not stop taking their medications unless they have their doctor’s approval to do so.

A doctor may suggest lowering the dosage of the medication or taking the drug earlier in the day. Sometimes, a doctor may suggest changing to a different medicine that does not cause dry mouth.

The doctor may also recommend the following:

  • taking medications with plenty of water
  • sipping on water at nighttime
  • chewing on gum to encourage saliva production
  • using a humidifier to release moisture into the air and alleviate sensations of dry mouth

Mouth breathing

Some people wake up during the night and notice that they have an extremely dry mouth. This can be a sign that they have been breathing through their mouth while asleep. Some possible causes of this behavior include:

Treatment:

The treatment for nighttime mouth breathing depends on the underlying cause. We outline the potential causes and their associated treatment options below.

Infections

Antibiotics can help to treat a bacterial infection, while decongestants may help to alleviate any associated sinus congestion.

Allergies

Antihistamines can help to treat allergies, while corticosteroids may also help to relieve any associated nasal inflammation and stuffiness.

Sleep apnea

People who experience sleep apnea may require a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. The CPAP is a mask that fits over the mouth or nose and blows air into the airways to keep them open during sleep.

Although the treatment is effective against sleep apnea, the constant stream of air can actually worsen symptoms of a dry mouth. A person should talk to their doctor or dentist who can adjust the mask or recommend a machine that does not dry out the mouth.

Narrowed nasal passages

In some cases, people who have severe difficulty breathing through their nose may require surgery to widen the nasal passages. This will help to promote airflow through the nasal passages, preventing the need for mouth breathing.

Sjogren’s syndrome

Sjogren’s syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its tear glands and saliva-producing glands. As a result, a person who has Sjogren’s syndrome will typically experience sensations of dry mouth. This symptom may worsen at nighttime when the salivary glands naturally produce less saliva.

People with Sjogren’s syndrome may experience the following symptoms as a result of dry mouth:

  • difficulty swallowing food without a drink
  • pain in the mouth
  • speech problems at night

They may also experience dryness in their eyes, nose, throat, or vagina.

Treatment:

Doctors may prescribe medications to reduce dry mouth and encourage saliva production. Examples include pilocarpine (Salagen) and cevimeline (Evoxac).

A doctor will also encourage people with Sjogren’s syndrome to drink water frequently, and chew sugar-free gum to stimulate saliva production.



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This entry was posted on January 30, 2020, in News.

Castor oil to induce labor: Risks and dangers


Over the years, people have tried many different methods to help induce labor naturally, from eating spicy food to bouncing on an exercise ball. Some people may be tempted to try castor oil as a means to help induce labor.

Those who consider using castor oil to induce labor should try to find out about its effectiveness, particularly the safety issues associated with its use for this purpose, before they try it. This is because there are significant dangers.

Keep reading for more information on the risks and dangers of using castor oil to induce labor, whether or not inducing labor is a good idea, and some other ways that may help those who wish to do so.

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Dehydration, diarrhea, and cramping in the stomach area are some possible side effects of taking castor oil.

Castor oil is an extract from Ricinus communis. R. communis is native to southern Asia.

For centuries, people have used castor oil for various ailments, though most applications only have the support of anecdotal evidence. Few scientific studies have addressed the effectiveness of castor oil in treating health conditions.

Castor oil is a common ingredient in soaps, coatings, lubricants, and other commercial products. It contains several allergenic proteins, including ricin, which research indicates is a potent and dangerous plant toxin.

However, following the removal of these potentially dangerous substances, people can use castor oil for pharmaceutical purposes. For example, castor oil can help with constipation. Learn more about castor oil and constipation here.

Castor oil also has potential benefits for the face and skin. Read about them here.

According to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, castor oil will likely cause uterine contractions and irritation. Although these may appear to be labor contractions, they are more likely the result of digestive distress than actual labor.

In fact, they go on to say that women who take oral castor oil are no more likely to go into labor than those who do not.

However, one recent study found that there is a connection between taking castor oil and inducing labor. The study concluded that castor oil may induce labor within 24 hours if a woman is 40 weeks pregnant.

Researchers conducted the study using women in their 40th and 41st weeks of pregnancy, over a period of 5 years.

A smaller study, this time from 2000, found that 57.7% of the women who took castor oil went into labor within 24 hours. Only 4.2% of the women who did not receive castor oil went into labor within 24 hours. Evidence from this study suggests that castor oil may help induce labor.

However, one 2009 study found no connection between taking castor oil and inducing labor. This study included over 600 participants in week 40 or above of their pregnancy. The study concluded that castor oil had no effect on the time of birth. It also did not seem to have any harmful effects.

A 2018 study found that castor oil induction is more effective in women who have had babies previously. The researchers reported no adverse effects from their sample of 81 pregnant women.

Another 2018 study looked back on women who had used castor oil (while 40–41 weeks pregnant) under the care of their doctor, and they found it to be effective in inducing labor within 24 hours for most of the women.

Though study results are mixed in terms of castor oil’s labor-inducing abilities, none of these studies examined issues of safety for either the mother or the fetus.

In previous studies, researchers have not come across any known risks to the fetus.

However, the mother may experience side effects from ingesting castor oil. Some potential side effects could include:

Women with sensitive stomachs or other gastrointestinal conditions should avoid taking castor oil. Also, those who have had a cesarean delivery in the past should never attempt castor oil ingestion while pregnant. Learn why below.

In most cases, the body will induce labor when it is ready to give birth. Some women may go into preterm labor, while others may go into labor later than their expected due date.

Importantly, women who have had a cesarean delivery should never attempt to induce labor. This is because it can cause uterine rupture.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine describe the journey to full term in the following ways:

  • 37–38 weeks and 6 days as “early term”
  • 39–40 weeks and 6 days as “full term”
  • 41 weeks to 41 weeks and 6 days as “late term”
  • 42 weeks and later as “post-term”

If a woman is at full term or beyond and yet to give birth, a healthcare professional will likely consider inducing labor or possibly scheduling a cesarean delivery.

Some other reasons a doctor may choose to induce labor include:

  • placental abruption
  • a uterus infection
  • a lack of amniotic fluid around the fetus
  • contractions without the water breaking
  • the fetus has stopped growing at the expected rate
  • the presence of high blood pressure, diabetes, or another condition that could put the mother or fetus at risk

There are no proven ways to induce labor at home. A doctor or healthcare provider can induce labor in a hospital or other clinical setting.

That said, there are some other methods to induce labor that may be effective. These include:

  • nipple stimulation
  • sexual intercourse
  • eating spicy foods
  • acupuncture
  • walking and exercise

It is important to note that none of these methods are scientifically proven, however.

Anyone concerned about going into labor should speak with a doctor or healthcare provider before attempting any methods themselves.

People should avoid using castor oil to try to induce labor, as there is no scientific evidence to prove its effectiveness for this purpose. It is much safer to work with a doctor if it is time to induce labor. Inducing labor before 40 weeks poses a risk to the fetus.

No studies have found any direct risks or dangers for the fetus in using castor oil, but in the mother, it can cause diarrhea, false contractions, dehydration, and other stomach-related side effects.

People who want to induce labor should speak with a doctor about their concerns.

There are no proven home methods for inducing labor, but a doctor or healthcare provider can help to induce labor in a clinical setting if there is a need for it.



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This entry was posted on January 29, 2020, in News.

Adnexal mass: Symptoms, treatment, and diagnosis


Adnexal masses are lumps that occur in the adnexa of the uterus, which includes the uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. They have several possible causes, which can be gynecological or nongynecological.

An adnexal mass could be:

A family doctor can usually manage benign masses. However, prepubescent and postmenopausal individuals will need to see a gynecologist or oncologist.

Malignant adnexal masses require treatment from a specialist.

In this article, we discuss the characteristics of adnexal masses. We also review how doctors diagnose and treat adnexal them.

People report different symptoms, depending on the cause of the adnexal mass.

People with an adnexal mass may report:

  • severe lower abdominal or pelvic pain that is usually on one side
  • abnormal bleeding from the uterus
  • pain during sexual intercourse
  • worsening pain during a period
  • painful periods
  • abnormally heavy bleeding during periods
  • abdominal symptoms, including a feeling of fullness, bloating, constipation, difficulty eating, increased abdominal size, indigestion, nausea, and vomiting
  • urinary urgency, frequency, or incontinence
  • weight loss
  • lack of energy
  • fatigue
  • fever
  • vaginal discharge

Different causes of adnexal masses may have similar symptoms, so doctors usually conduct further investigations to determine the exact cause.

Once the doctor has worked out the cause of the adnexal mass, they can recommend treatment and management.

Adnexal masses include a variety of different conditions that range in severity from benign growths to malignant tumors.

The cause of adnexal masses could be gynecological or nongynecological.

Some of the causes of adnexal masses include:

  • Ectopic pregnancy: A pregnancy where the fertilized egg implants somewhere outside the uterus.
  • Endometrioma: A benign cyst on the ovary that contains thick, old blood that appears brown.
  • Leiomyoma: A benign gynecological tumor, also known as a fibroid.
  • Ovarian cancer: These tumors of the ovary may be ovarian epithelial cancers that begin in the cells on the surface of the ovary or malignant germ cell cancers that begin in the eggs.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease: Inflammation of the upper genital tract, which includes the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. It occurs due to an infection.
  • Tubo-ovarian abscess: An infectious adnexal mass that forms because of pelvic inflammatory disease.
  • Ovarian torsion: A gynecological emergency involving a complete or partial rotation of the tissue that supports the ovary, which cuts off blood flow to the ovary.

A doctor may diagnose an adnexal mass by:

  • taking a complete medical history
  • asking questions about symptoms
  • conducting a physical examination
  • obtaining blood samples

Most of the time, people will need a transvaginal ultrasound to allow doctors to evaluate the characteristics of an adnexal mass.

Females who have had a positive pregnancy test result and report abdominal or pelvic pain and vaginal bleeding might have an ectopic pregnancy. An ovarian torsion causes sudden, severe pain with nausea and vomiting. Immediate medical attention is necessary to treat both an ectopic pregnancy and ovarian torsion.

People with pelvic inflammatory disease or a tubo-ovarian abscess may experience gradual pelvic pain with nausea and vaginal bleeding.

Early ovarian cancer may sometimes present with nonspecific symptoms. Sometimes, doctors may only detect cancer when the tumor has become malignant.

Malignant tumors may have one or several of the following characteristics:

  • a solid component of the tumor
  • parts of the tumor have thick divisions larger than 2–3 centimeters separating them
  • they are present on both sides of the reproductive tract
  • the presence of fluid filled lumps

A doctor will choose the most appropriate treatment depending on the cause of the adnexal mass. Women with an ectopic pregnancy will have to end their pregnancy. A doctor may choose one of the following procedures:

  • the administration of a single or two-dose intramuscular methotrexate
  • laparoscopic surgery
  • a salpingostomy or salpingectomy, which are surgical procedures involving the fallopian tubes

Doctors have not yet determined the optimal management of an endometrioma, according to a study that featured in Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey.

Currently, the possible treatments for an endometrioma include:

  • watchful waiting
  • medical therapy
  • surgical intervention
  • inducing ovulation and using assisted reproductive technology in females with infertility

People with pelvic inflammatory disease will require courses of intravenous antibiotics, which may include:

  • cefotetan (Cefotan)
  • cefoxitin (Mefoxin)
  • clindamycin (Cleocin)

Some people can receive treatment outside of the hospital setting with oral doxycycline (Vibramycin) and intramuscular ceftriaxone (Rocephin) or another third generation cephalosporin antibiotic. In some cases, doctors will need to add oral metronidazole (Flagyl).

In the past, tubo-ovarian abscesses required surgical removal of the uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. However, doctors can now prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics. A person with a ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess may still require surgery.

Ovarian torsion is a gynecological emergency. The only treatment is surgery to prevent severe damage to the ovaries and fallopian tubes.

People with leiomyomas or fibroids may receive hormonal treatments or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to control the symptoms. Once a person stops taking medication, the symptoms may return, and the fibroids may continue to grow. Surgery is the most successful treatment for fibroids.

The treatment options for ovarian cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Oncologists will consider the following factors before recommending a treatment plan:

  • the type of ovarian cancer and how much cancer is present
  • the stage and grade of the cancer
  • whether the person has a buildup of fluid in the abdomen causing swelling
  • whether surgery can remove the whole tumor
  • genetic changes
  • the person’s age and general health status
  • whether it is a new diagnosis, or if cancer has come back

Risk factors depend on the cause of the adnexal mass. Females with ovarian masses have an increased risk of developing ovarian torsion. More than 80% of females with ovarian torsion have masses of 5 cm or larger.

Doctors diagnose fibroids in about 70% of white females and more than 80% of black females by the age of 50 years. Other factors may increase a person’s risk of developing fibroids, such as:

  • starting periods early in life
  • using oral contraceptives before 16 years of age
  • an increase in body mass index (BMI)

Ovarian cancer can run in families. People with a family history of ovarian cancer may have an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. Other risk factors include:

The likelihood of developing cancer also tends to increase with age.

Adnexal masses are lumps that doctors may find in the adnexal of the uterus, which is the part of the body that houses the uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. Not all masses are cancerous, and they do not all require treatment.

Different types of adnexal mass can share many of the same symptoms. As a result, doctors need to collect a full medical history and data from physical examinations, blood tests, and medical imaging, including transvaginal ultrasounds.

Doctors need to pinpoint the location and cause of an adnexal mass to determine the appropriate management and treatment.



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This entry was posted on January 28, 2020, in News.

How long does it stay in your system?


Molly, which is another name for the drug MDMA, typically stays in a person’s system for several days. The exact length of time depends on several factors, including the person’s metabolism and the amount of the drug they have taken.

Different drug tests have different detection periods. Some tests can detect molly for only a day or two after a person has taken the drug. Others can detect the drug after several months.

Read on to learn more about drug testing, how molly works, and how long it takes for the body to metabolize it.

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Increased heart rate, sweating, and blurred vision are possible side effects of molly.

Molly quickly enters the bloodstream. Although the effects may wear off within a few hours, traces of the drug can remain in the body for several days.

It is difficult to determine exactly how long molly will stay in a person’s system. It depends on many factors, including:

  • the amount they took
  • the time of their last dose
  • their overall health
  • the rate of their metabolism
  • whether or not they are taking any medications
  • when they last ate a meal
  • the purity of the drug

According to some research, molly is typically detectable for 24–72 hours, but it can remain in small traces for up to 5 days. That being said, because tolerance increases with use, chronic use can cause molly to remain detectable in the system for up to a week later.

Usually, these readings are based on intakes of 50–160 milligrams (mg). Higher doses may remain in bodily fluids for longer, increasing the detection window.

There are a number of ways to test for the presence of molly. Some drug tests, including their detection windows, are as follows:

Blood tests

Research suggests that blood tests can detect molly within 30 minutes of ingestion. The drug remains detectable for approximately 24–48 hours, depending on the testing modality.

Saliva tests

According to some research, saliva tests may detect a single recreational dose (70–150 mg) of MDMA for 1–2 days. It may first be detectable within minutes of ingestion.

Urine tests

According to one study, molly is detectable in urine as early as 25 minutes after the ingestion of high doses, and it typically remains detectable for 1–3 days.

However, some samples can still show the presence of molly’s metabolites on days 5 and 6 after ingestion.

Hair tests

Research shows that traces of molly can remain in hair fibers for several months after a person last takes the drug.

Hair testing has a detection window of approximately 1 month per 0.5 inches of hair. Therefore, it is possible to detect an approximate time of ingestion based on the segment of hair that tests positive for the drug.

Once a person ingests molly, the intestines absorb the chemicals and filter them into the bloodstream. A person who takes molly in tablet or capsule form may begin to feel the effects after around 45 minutes.

The effects of recreational doses of MDMA (50–150 mg) peak within 2 hours of a person taking it orally. If a person opts for nasal administration instead, they will notice the effects much sooner.

The drug’s effects then begin to wear off. In general, the effects last up to 6 hours after ingestion.

Molly affects the brain by increasing the activity of three brain chemicals: serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. A surge in these chemicals causes effects such as:

  • increased heart rate
  • increased blood pressure
  • a boost in energy levels
  • elevated mood
  • nausea
  • chills
  • sweating
  • blurred vision
  • muscle cramps
  • teeth clenching

These effects may last for 3–6 hours. In the days and weeks following moderate molly intake, other symptoms and side effects can emerge. These include:

  • mood changes, including aggression and irritability
  • anxiety and depression
  • sleep problems
  • loss of appetite
  • issues with memory and attention span
  • loss of libido

Learn more about the effects and risks of taking molly here.

When a person takes molly orally, the drug makes its way into the stomach before moving to the intestines. From here, it passes into the bloodstream. At this point, the person begins to feel the effects of molly.

This includes effects on the stomach, heart, blood vessels, and muscles, as well as neurological effects such as agitation and anxiety.

The liver then breaks down the drug into chemical compounds called metabolites. MDMA and its metabolites pass to the kidneys, which will filter the drug out of the bloodstream.

The chemicals then move to the bladder, and they eventually leave the body in the urine. The body will also excrete some metabolites through feces and sweat.

The half-life of molly is approximately 8–9 hours. A drug’s half-life is the time it takes for the amount of the drug in a person’s system to be reduced by half. Research indicates that it takes five half-lives for the body to clear over 95% of the molly a person has taken.

Some MDMA metabolites may remain in a person’s system for even longer than this, though drug tests do not usually detect them.

Rate of metabolization

Factors that affect the rate of metabolization include the amount of molly a person has ingested and the time at which they took their last dose. Other factors that affect the rate of metabolization include the person’s:

  • age
  • weight
  • metabolism
  • liver health
  • kidney health
  • last dose of other medications

Combining molly with other drugs may also affect the rate at which their body can process the chemicals.

There is also the risk that the drugs are contaminated with other substances. Many molly and ecstasy tablets contain MDMA, but also:

  • dextromethorphan, which is an over-the-counter cough suppressant
  • caffeine
  • cocaine
  • heroin
  • ketamine
  • methamphetamine
  • phencyclidine

If a molly tablet or powder contains these substances, metabolization times can vary greatly.

It is not possible to speed up the detox process for molly. The body will clear it from the system at its own pace, based on the liver’s ability to break down the drug.

Some people believe that drinking water can remove molly from the system more quickly. However, this is not the case. In fact, drinking too much water could lead to hyponatremia, or water toxicity.

Similarly, vigorous exercise will not boost the body’s ability to metabolize molly. Exercise may increase thirst, which could prompt people to drink more water.

In some cases, especially in females, hyponatremia can be fatal. Learn more about the condition here.

Molly, or MDMA, can remain in the system for several days. Hair testing, however, can detect drug use several months after a person takes their last dose. Chronic use of molly can cause it to remain in the system for longer.

The liver metabolizes the drug, and the kidneys excrete most of it through urine. The body will also remove some of the drug from the system through sweat and feces.

It is not possible to speed up the metabolization process of molly, and some methods that claim to do so can be dangerous.



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This entry was posted on January 27, 2020, in News.